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Half job Harry & temporary solutions
Dean
Posted: Friday, November 20, 2009 2:21 PM
Joined: 17/06/2008
Posts: 71


When you come to a shipyard you expect a certain level of competence from staff and assume shipyards know the fundamental class requirements for different sized yachts, because they are the professionals after all. Pressing for jobs to be done correctly, maintaining the build quality and class standards is a shared responsibility that would become much easier if shipyard staff adhered to a competence level. Cutting corners and failing to comprehend rudimentary concepts is an outcome of deficient training and communication. Shipyards engaged in the refit and repair of yachts above 500gt can not apply boatyard rules and need to develop staff. I recently had to explain the purpose of a watertight deck to shipyard staff and prevent them from drilling straight into a watertight space.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, March 3, 2012 7:10 PM
Looking for some advice from engineers and E.R savvy captains and crew, In point for just throwing ideas around what should 1 need to service/ check on a daily weekly monthly period. - sea strainers, chests - typical engine checks - fuel separators - generator troubleshooting - test fire fighting bilge pumps - bleeding - change filters what have I missed and any input on refrigeration, hydraulics, water pumps, A/C, batteries, watermaker, black water processor etc
junior
Posted: Saturday, March 3, 2012 8:22 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


On a new build, a skilled workman follows a precise chain of command coming from the design office, engineering office, project manager and the shop floor chief engineer . Very few goofy mistakes are made. I have never seen this depth of quality control at any repair facility that Ive used. At a repair yard The engineering staff on the yacht must assume responsibility. As you know this means very much work for the engineers and many times the skills are beyond the engineer. I have a friend who has recently been promoted to chief engineer at a shipyard in the Netherlands . He has been involved with 170 new builds over a 23 year career as fitter at the yard. The 60 or so men now working under him also have many years of experience and only perform work that they a certified to perform . A repair yards staff of fitters and sub contractors cant compete with the level of craftsmanship provided by new build yards. . You must provide guidance.
rodsteel
Posted: Sunday, March 4, 2012 3:05 AM
Joined: 25/06/2009
Posts: 277


Junior, While your comments are quite relevant to yard work. How do they apply to the poster's question regarding daily engineering maintenance/safety issues? Is there a web site that lists the answers somewhere? Rod
junior
Posted: Sunday, March 4, 2012 8:04 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


If you expect the yacht to stay in "as built " condition the daily maintenance and safety issues must be handled internally by the yacht . This means supervision of all works performed by contractors and shipyard staff This is the reason you assume that a complex vessel has a sophisticated command structure , with a captain who understands the vessel , an engineer who has the technical and craftsmanship skills to oversee the work order and a talented crew who works side by side with the shipyard. . I am in the shipyard right now. I cant see the Pro yachts working and I can see the yachts staffed by paper ticket boat drivers. The Pro yachts always seem to get the job done to factory specs. The amateurs , who sign the work order then go on holiday, will have Warranty issues. Concerning maintenance schedule ? My only guidance is the technical documents supplied by equipment manufacture and a lifetime of dealing with systems. The hydraulic system documents state...inspect rubber hoses for chafe ..... contaminated oil and faulty electric connection are the cause of 90 percent of downtime issues. As a result every year I climb around with a flashlight inspect, clean, replace. Unfortunately the documents don't tell you how many rotational hours equals the duty cycle of a load sensing pump . I must call Rexroth. Experience tells me that "O" ring seals on hardware like oil coolers harden and flatten with age. It doesn't tell me at what age, so I replace and inspect every second season. Experience tells me that hydraulic rams who rest in the open or closed position will errode the chromium plateing on the shaft. Experience tells me that monofilenment fishing line builds up between the prop hub and shaft oil seal damaging the seal. Experience tells me that if you have a water lubricated cutless bearing you triple check that the system is bled and working when you launch. The list goes on and on. When do you re torque high tension electrical connections ? I have no idea, but I know that a fire will result if you don't, so every year I patrol around and re torque.
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, March 4, 2012 3:01 PM
the reason I ask these questions is that the boat is old '02 yr and I am relativly new to the industry and further more the E.R is not my dept but am quite happy and comfortable working with and in the E.R. the boat is also only 25m so was just looking for basic routine "2nd engineer" or junior engineer" projects of that of a bigger boat? thanks
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, March 4, 2012 3:56 PM
In my humble opinion, one is not ready to run a vessel, especially a small one with no engineer until they know how to maintain it and keep the propellers turning. What happens when your engines shut down due to a clogged strainer or fuel filter? Can you change said filter and bleed the air out of the fuel system, re-start your engines  and save your vessel from a catastrophe? A kin to being unable to raise the main sail when running a sail boat. Some 25m yachts can have 4000 kW packed into her engine room, more than some 50m yachts. There is more to running a yacht than doing a zero to hero course and waving a yacht  master 'stifakit' at your employer.
Perhaps you should hire a free lance engineer for a couple of weeks who is willing to show you the basics and set up some maintenance routines for you. Other than that, carefully read the operator manuals before starting up your systems to avoid damage. They will have maintenance schedules printed in them that you can photo copy and put into your engineering folder. Also, get a list of all your oils and fluids and what goes where, how much they need and up date your parts, oil and filters inventories. That will help you get familiar with your equipment. Sounds like you have a steep learning curve ahead of you. On an old yacht like that think about having the fuel tanks cleaned. If there is a maintenance log then you may be in good shape, if not, then it is likely not much has been done. Probably start with changing all the fluids and all the filters on everything, then clean all the heat exchangers, especially on the air con. Buy a new water maker membrane. Run all your pumps and listen to hear if the bearings are gone. Check your shaft seals. Check your exhaust for fluid leakage and gas colour. Check your battery electolyte levels, test them and replace if necessary. Check your bilges carefully for fluid (oil, water) and find and fix all leaks, test all shut off valves. Test steering, proplusion, thrusters, instruments, lights, signals, bilge and smoke alarms, LSA, wipers. Then worry about your TV, internet, galley, tenders. Good luck!

junior
Posted: Sunday, March 4, 2012 6:36 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


When you are a new guy on a yacht the fastest education is to do a pre season cruise and use all equipment. Certify that your insurance is in order then Do the cruise today. It will give you plenty of time to make any repairs before the season starts. I do a pre season cruise every year...every year some gremlin creeps up...autopilot wanky, radar lost self tune, anchor winch control circuit intermittent, bow thruster INSIDE alarm stuck ...is the short list from last weeks 100 mile delivery cruise. Dealing with these issues will force you to consult the manuals, introduce you to many engineering details as well as absorbing technical advice from contractors servicing the gear..
Henning
Posted: Monday, March 5, 2012 2:27 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Anonymous wrote:
the reason I ask these questions is that the boat is old '02 yr and I am relativly new to the industry and further more the E.R is not my dept but am quite happy and comfortable working with and in the E.R. the boat is also only 25m so was just looking for basic routine "2nd engineer" or junior engineer" projects of that of a bigger boat? thanks


Contact me offline, Google caphenning for contact details

Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, March 18, 2012 10:12 AM
"In my humble opinion, one is not ready to run a vessel, especially a small one with no engineer until they know how to maintain it and keep the propellers turning. What happens when your engines shut down due to a clogged strainer or fuel filter? Can you change said filter and bleed the air out of the fuel system, re-start your engines and save your vessel from a catastrophe?" I fully agree with that statement however I am in no position to tell my Capt. what he can or cant do, however although I am new i could infact change filter and bleed the system avoiding catastrophe and yes we running 16v 2000hp motors however i only know how to do so cause nobody else does and i have to research and compare notes/diagrams/literature with the corresponding parts infront of me in the E.R. No maintenance log nor operators manuels (fun boat isn't it) hence im digging at the interweb thing and forums like a gold miner trying to create a service/maintenance plan. Thinking about putting my YM ticket away and starting engineering. there is allot more satisfaction in repairing cleaning and taking pride in an engine/E.R and the satisfaction gained is second to none vs deck certs.
 
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