Welcome to the Dockwalk.com Forum

 

In order to post a comment in one of the forum topics, you must log in or sign up. Your display name will appear next to your posts unless you check the Post Anonymously box. When writing a post, please follow our forum guidelines. If you come across a post that you would like us to review, use the Report Post button. Please note the opinions shared in the forums do not necessarily reflect the views of Dockwalk.


RSS Feed Print
Fix it now & avoid inconvenient situations
Dean
Posted: Monday, November 2, 2009 6:10 PM
Joined: 17/06/2008
Posts: 71


I doubt anyone would pay for cosmetic surgery if they had a terminal disease, yet so many yachts focus on the fluffy stuff and squander budgets on non-essential items. The yachts structure and technical systems support the matrix that delivers all vessel services. Equipment reliability, safety and effectively processing emissions from the yacht are a direct outcome of technical systems and the maintenance and/or repair activities completed by crew, sub-contractors and shipyards. Understanding the hierarchy of vital and non-vital systems is important because everything is linked, for example light emitted from a bulb is the outcome many devices within the electrical distribution and power management system working properly. Failing to manage improvised repairs and bypassed machinery progressively depreciates the yachts value and will increase the resource requirements needed to bring machinery to the correct standard. Corrective actions are activities that return machinery to the original manufactures standard and include tests that comfirm system functions in all modes of operation. Leaving equipment bypassed and in makeshift conditions reduces the likelihood of adequate repairs being made in the future when failures occur. System redundancy is maintained when temporary repairs are corrected and the standby / emergency backup machinery place back into the proper sequence. Smart owners, managers and captains provide crew sufficient resources for proper maintenance and repairs because nothing can be achieved without adequate resources and the safety budget should always overide the fluffy bits budget.
Oceana Logistics
Posted: Wednesday, November 4, 2009 6:48 PM
Joined: 28/07/2009
Posts: 3


Here Here !!
Very well said Dean, as a Large Yacht engineer myself, I have seen it & experienced it way too many times !! Too much emphasis placed on "fluffy stuff" Many management companies & owners forget that if the vessel is not maintained mechanically to a good standard, then it no longer becomes an asset or even a boat for that matter, it actually becomes a huge liability and a serious accident waiting to happen.
I think that those involved with setting the budgets for these vessels, should ask themselves if they were to go out on the yacht, would they like to be able to make it back to port and be safe !!

Haley
Posted: Wednesday, November 4, 2009 7:44 PM
Joined: 13/11/2008
Posts: 18


I think especially now I'm seeing that trend more often as I think some of the mentality shown by the owners is that they don't want to pay for the big stuff (ours just refused to pay for one of the periodic maintenance checks on the gens) because they are hoping to sell the boat. While we are hardly allowed to spend anything right now (despite still running a busy charter schedule), I am allowed to order more uniform because that is what is more immediately noticeable to owners and guests alike and our current couture is quite manky looking. However, even new towels and sheets are getting ixnayed (after 3 years with the same ones I don't think it's too much to ask for).I think many of the crucial maitenance and update/upgrade issues will continue to be ignored by boat owners who are hoping to save themselves $$$ in case the boat sells tomorrow. Maybe the post-FLIBS shakedown will help loosen the purse strings a little when owners realize their boat isn't going to sell anytime soon and some of the pressing issues need to be addressed, 'fluffy' items or not.

 


Oceana Coffee
Posted: Wednesday, November 4, 2009 9:22 PM
Joined: 04/11/2009
Posts: 1


Haley wrote:

I think especially now I'm seeing that trend more often as I think some of the mentality shown by the owners is that they don't want to pay for the big stuff (ours just refused to pay for one of the periodic maintenance checks on the gens) because they are hoping to sell the boat. While we are hardly allowed to spend anything right now (despite still running a busy charter schedule), I am allowed to order more uniform because that is what is more immediately noticeable to owners and guests alike and our current couture is quite manky looking. However, even new towels and sheets are getting ixnayed (after 3 years with the same ones I don't think it's too much to ask for).I think many of the crucial maitenance and update/upgrade issues will continue to be ignored by boat owners who are hoping to save themselves $$$ in case the boat sells tomorrow. Maybe the post-FLIBS shakedown will help loosen the purse strings a little when owners realize their boat isn't going to sell anytime soon and some of the pressing issues need to be addressed, 'fluffy' items or not.

 At least the crew will look good whilst in the dark !! The other part that most owners do not realize is that everytime they pass over a maintenance schedule, it will be one more thing added to the surveyors report that will reduce the new buyers price !! But hey, at least the sheets, towels & uniforms are all in good condition for the new owner to change the name of & throw out !!



 
 Average 0 out of 5