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Why are you a yachtie?
Henning
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2009 11:52 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Reading through this forum, I see all sorts of complaints about the industry, and it makes me wonder why people are in it, so I thought I'd ask. As for myself, it was a culmination of talents and desires. I was born with "The Mechanic Gene", there will be those who say "huh?" and those who know what I'm talking about. If you got your but spanked at 6 years old for taking apart household appliances, you have the mechanic gene. I also have a very good sense of motion, energy and inertia which makes me an above average equipment operator. If it moves, I can run it. I hold a 3000ton Masters, a Commercial Pilots rating, Crane Operators license for static and dynamic cranes, class A CDL.... and have worked them all at some point. Due to my upbringing and probable genetics as well looking at my ancestors, I love to travel, not just experiencing the places, but the challenges of getting to them as well. The maritime sector suited me among others and provided the best pay and most interesting toys to work/play with. I got into the yachting end of the business after all my time away from home brought about a failed marriage. Relationships don't do well when you're apart 270+ days a year for years at a time. Since yachting to an extent encourages couples to work together, I figured it would be a decent place to go. I've enjoyed most of the people I've met, crews, owners and guests alike, and I get to do other things I enjoy such as dive and fly. Looks like with this boat I'm going to be learning to surf as well. So, what is it that lead you down the path to being on a yacht, and what keeps you there?
junior
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2009 4:57 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


I was born into it. I grew up sandwiched between shipyards. Most kids first words are MOMMA or POO POO mine was GARBOARD PLANK. I seriously thought that everyone had a boat. These things happen. And Henning...I'm not sure what your native tongue is, but in my world the word "yachty" is a derogatory term used when referring to the wide eyed "Blow In", gangly legged, Bambi's who crew yachts for the summer then find nothing more worthwhile from their experience than to complain. Please !! In the future refer to us as sailors or seaman. Why am I a seaman ? Henning, I just rode my pushbike back to the yacht along the waterfront . The yacht is berthed for the next three months in one of the most beautiful ports on earth, the season is over, the afternoon sun was warm, I'm high fiving my mates and cracking jokes as I ride along the docks with a fresh ,out of the oven, Baguette. Life is beautiful and only a precious few chosen people from the mass of humanity are allowed to enjoy my bike ride. All the sweat and tears of a grueling 10,000 mile cruise are a mere afterthought in the context of the life I have been allowed to live. A seaman working the yacht scene is empowered to visit the most extreme, exotic places on earth while simultaneously being fortified with a bankroll supplied by the wealthiest most sophisticated class . One minute we are hunkered down battling everything nature can throw at us, the next minute we are sitting at dinner with billionaire industrialists ,carefully listening to their view of the latest credit crunch. Why do I do it ? Yikes, why doesn't everyone do it ? Many times I just cant believe that people PAY ME to do this . For Christs sake we just drove this multi million dollar machine on a wild downwind , runaway freight train ride, for one thousand miles. How the hell else would I ever experience this ?
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2009 5:34 PM
The money...

Anonymous
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2009 6:17 PM
The money and the ladies. Lets not forget about the ladies...
Henning
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2009 9:44 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Not every seaman works on yachts is why I made the distinction, never considered it derogatory, sorry about that, and not everyone working on yachts is a seaman....
junior
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 8:21 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


One of the reasons you see so much complaining from yachties is that they are not seaman and when they are forced to live the seamans life they implode. Its almost a given that yachties complain about everything...salary, living condition, nationalities, scheduling, this forum is even full of yachties who like to complain about the worth of stewardess's. I can pass on a valuable tip from a long time around the water. To keep your crew from falling into the yachty hole never schedule down time with the yacht in a Yachties Mecca port. Those places are overflowing with disgruntled snakes hanging around bars, talking trash, about who makes the most money, or which captain , owner , mate, stewardess, chef...is an ashole and their bad attitude will rub off on your gang. Be wise and choose a port outside the fire zone, a port where your crew will interact with real people. A crew need only spend a week in the port I presently berth before they realize that paradise is great, but that in paradise the local economy is dwarfed and will never create enough good jobs. As yacht crew you are the highest paid, most pampered worker in paradise. Only a seaman can understand this. If a crew gets into yachting without the intention of becoming a seaman their career will be limited to a few summer positions during high season when anything that walks gets a position. This beast is called a yachty.
FEDERICO MTZ ARCHDALE
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 4:16 PM
Joined: 22/09/2009
Posts: 1


for the love of the sea! , the life style, the being outdoors all day long, the sea breeze , the hard work and constant challenges, the sun, the good crews (that are not in for just the money) the traveling, the cruising, for when the guests are not onboard, for when they are aboard, the???? I guess ALL OF IT!
carabosko
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 4:19 PM
Joined: 27/05/2008
Posts: 2


I am a yachtie because I love the new people I get to meet and the new places to see. Being a chef in a restaurant you don't have any windows to look out unless you work on a boat! and you get to spend other peoples money! Boss may be very demanding, but there are always the rewards in the end! I love my job and work hard but I always play harder!
penguin
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 4:23 PM
Joined: 18/11/2008
Posts: 2



I love the sea. I love people. I love service. Why not get paid for all that love and fuel the smiles I have? The complaints I hear from people on this forum tell me they need a break..its not a lifestyle that is sustainable within itself for the soul, I suggest to these tired souls to make base camp somewhere they love, go rest and come to the sea work when ready to serve with a smile.  It works better for everyone that way. Thoughts are things and your energy is felt aboard, its just that no-one has told you this yet.  The sea is a body of energy just like you, she's our container and does not want nor need any negative energy upon her or in her. Thank you.

captain paul
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 5:00 PM
Joined: 05/05/2008
Posts: 9


I LOVE BOATS! Power or sail, old and new, my wife and I usually play a game of guess the make of a boat, we pretty much know them all. I love driving boat, I have to gigle to myself when I get at the helm because I'm getting paid to do this. I love working on boats, the satisfaction I get from sanding a piece of wood or even just wiping down the the hull of a beautifully finished paint job is sex to me. I love other yachties, people that truely share the same passion as me. We can often talk for hours on different anchors, motors, watermakers, whatever, it's just conversation that feels good. Being a mechanic and having a love for mechinery where else can you go where you don't have to leave the house to play with your engines? (sorry ladies, it's a guy thing) Boating is an addiction, when I'm not working on someone else's boat I'm on my own. If you are working on boats solely for the money I feel sorry for you because you just don't get it.

bradsontour
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 5:18 PM
Joined: 04/09/2008
Posts: 6


How about Yachtsperson. That should keep all the PC crew happy. No offence taken here. Its a knickname for crew. All industries have them. I'm in it so when I retire I don't need to spend double on my house to get an ocean view. I will have seen it enough by then.
Elena
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 7:37 PM
Joined: 18/10/2008
Posts: 2


Waw and Wow boys and girls. I don't understand why there are arguments, it's a simple question and the answers should come only from people that do indeed love yachting. Why do I love it? I don't even know where to start, but I think most of it it's because of the smell. Most of you, probably with way more experience in the industry don't know what I'm talking about, but for me, that I'm new, it's the smell. The smell of the boat, the smell of the wood inside the boat, for me it smells like freedom, and God knows nothing smells better then freedom. Most of the people go outside in the morning and take a deep breath and they start their day, I just go on boat, enter in the main saloon, take a deep breath and I feel my day is already starting well. And after there's the sea, and who can contest the power of the sea? I grow up and lived all my life in a small mountain city, untill my first job on board I didn't even knew about yachting industry, and boy, was I surprised how challenging and magnificent it can be. It's freedom, that's what yachting or whatever you want to call it means to me: FREEDOM and as I recall it's the most valuble thing there is.
junior
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 7:42 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Really good to see some happy yacht crew !!! People and cultures. Its half the pleasure to our life style. Always a new stimulation. The crew on my port side are Russian/Israeli. Since its the weekend, we rallied around, then cruised to the pub and watched a replay of the Russia vs Germany world cup qualifier match on the big screne. I find it fascinating to listen to other nationalities view of the world. I find it fascinating to learn the inside story and intrigues behind the big Russian football clubs. Most people in life have to rely on some media caricature to describe a nation or its people. When you are a seaman working the yachts you have first hand knowledge. When you work on yachts you actually sail to St Petersburgh and you see with your own eyes that its is one of the most stimulating, great seaport cities in the world. The Hermitage, the Summer palace, the River Neva..... When you work on yachts you don't approach new cultures and counties as a cheeseburger chomping tourist, you are a working class seaman getting the job done and as a result local people treat you in an entirely different way. You know who they are The rest of the worlds wonders who is a Bosnian ? You know beacuaes you sail your guests to Mostar every year. The rest of the world wonders ...2014 Winter Olympics Sochi ??.....you know as a yacht crew because you sail there. And here comes Rio !!!!
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 8:03 PM
Im not sure yachtie is right word, where I come from the word refers to plonkers with too much cash who buy a racing yacht (only to fit in) and hang out in cowes one or two weeks of the year get drunk, talk crap and generally make a nuisance of themselves.

Maybe you should have asked "Why are you a slave to the yachting industry?" and my answar is because the UK is a joke because of spineless politicians and the weather there is crap, it will also be the money when I get a decent wage.

Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 8:31 PM
jijijijiijiji.. Why do the "yachties" drink so much? Aren´t they happy with that incredible life of "freedom"?
AllyJ
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 8:47 PM
Joined: 21/03/2009
Posts: 19


I'm a romantic - what can I say... Oh - and a bit of a gypsy... I must go down to the sea again, to the lonely sea and the sky, And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by, And the wheel's kick and the wind's song and the white sail's shaking, And a gray mist on the seas face, and a gray dawn breaking. I must go down to the sea again for the call of the running tide Is a wild call and a clear call thay may not be denied; And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying And the flung spray and the blown spume and the seagulls crying I must go down to the sea again to the vagrant gypsy life To the gulls' way and the whales' way, where the wind's like a whetted knife And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow rover And a quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick's over... One of my favourite poems by John Masefield. Enjoy! A xooxox
Elena
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 9:01 PM
Joined: 18/10/2008
Posts: 2


Well, that was just why I love yachting, that was what yachting means to me. Never said it's simple or pink always, but I was talking about the big picture. And I don't beleive only yachties drink too much, take a look around, it's full of alcoholics everywhere and not all of them are yachties. Maybe because I have only 1 year of experience but I never worked with people that had a drinking problem. I'm sure there are, like in any other industry, you can't expect everybody to be perfect, and in case yachting is what makes this yachtie having a drinking problem maybe they should ask themselves what else could make them happy. This is a simple question and I don't understand why so many disputes. If you don't love yachting just wait for the right question to say all you have in mind.
Salvador
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 11:03 PM
Joined: 22/07/2009
Posts: 97


Hi!

Once, I was told by an elder that  "people who do what they love, they don't work" .....  I wondered how good it would be to live like that..... 3 years ago, when I found myself activly doing it, with a smile, without being told to, (except specifics),  no timetables, hearing "good job!"    I asked "job????"  : )   Ok !!!!  from there I never left!!

Cheers!

 

 


CaptErik
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 3:18 AM
Joined: 09/09/2008
Posts: 64


I read my email and it says "what makes you continue working on big white boats?" . Well this is the most blatant form of discrimination I have seen yet! I happen to work on a big blue boat. There are  more and more of us BlueYachties every year! You white yachties will soon be the minority, and us blues will remember how we were treated Viva la revelution!!!
Ben Franklin
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 4:35 AM
Joined: 04/10/2009
Posts: 19


Hey BlueYachty, you wanna team up with us GreenYachties and stage a revolution together?

Croydon
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 9:02 AM
Joined: 14/10/2008
Posts: 1


Well for me it's the freedom of a great job and traveling, being a freelance chef on Super Yachts is quite honestly the BEST job . 5yrs now and it's still great fun with the opportunity to cook with the best products all these great country's we visit have to offer not to mention the regatta's and the awesome people we encounter. As for being called a Yactie hardly derogatory in our circles seamen or sailor is more applicable to those in fishing or the navy, don't ya think? Last but not least the Money is bloody excellent
junior
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 11:31 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Interesting to hear what attracts crew to work on the yachts. As CaptPaul says...you gotta like boats, design and naval architecture. I just walked back to the yacht via a shortcut under the fence and thru the shipyard. I cant walk thru a shipyard without stopping and casting a close critical eye over the design or details of any vessel out of the water. A poorly executed boot top on the " money no object" yacht that falls down in the ends and makes the yacht looked hogged. The double ended inshore fishing boat with elegant foot steps built into its wooded stem so the fisherman can climb back aboard. . The dimpled rudder on a single screw ski boat to keep neautral helm in prop wash. Cast iron external ballast with corrosion expansion so powerful its pulling its bolts thru the keel . Overtightened jack stands oil canning an aluminum yacht. The aft canards and stepped chines on an outrageous high speed jet powered launch. Modern sandwich construction crushed at Bmax from fender loading........ Outsiders cant just grab the wife and kids then cruise over to yard and check it out....the shipyard security officer would throw them out before they made it past the fence. But since security knows your an insider working on the water and you regularly feed doggy treats to his musclebound Rottweiler guard dog, he pays no notice. If you like boats its a gift to make your living on the water.
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 4:25 PM
Money, hairgel, Ralph Lauren shirts, black Calvin Kleins unda-wear, more hair gel, mye rawk star status in when I get back home to South Africa.  Not having to go to college for it.  Buying a house within a short amount of time is pretty good too.
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2009 10:19 AM
Cos I make Loads of Dosh !
Meet the Rich and Famous...................
And get to Fly in Private Airplanes and Helicopters.................
Have Appartments in Cannes,Marbella,Paris,Monte Carlo,New York,London,Singapore.................Hey !

tonio71
Posted: Saturday, October 24, 2009 8:58 PM
Joined: 15/10/2009
Posts: 5


Folks,

You make me sick...it's a pity you don't have just human gene.

Don't you think that your life would be more helpfull by working for people who really need attention. Imagine the budget of a 40m motoryacht, imagine having 20 millions euros to build school, improve health care or install pumps and other water system.

Human dignity is the true measure of human development....think about it.


Chief
Posted: Saturday, October 24, 2009 9:48 PM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 341


No, you need to think about it, and I mean really think about it before you storm in an start waving your protest posters. To begin with, damn few people are going to give away 20 miillion anything out of their pockets to build a school or drill a water well. That same investment in a yacht employed hundreds if not thousands of people directly and indirectly during its construction over a period of several years. Those people paid taxes and donated funds to the organizations that did help build schools and drill water wells. Maintaining that yacht employs many hundreds of people each year who pay taxes and more of them than you have the wit to comprehend probably feel the same way you do about the environment and social causes. Let me give you some advice, stop acting like you are the only one in the world who has discovered that very real environmental and social injustices exist. The individual who paid that 20 million has already paid more, one way or the other, toward correcting those problems than you are likely to earn in your lifetime, much less donate to your cause d' jour. Find someplace else to exhibit your ignorance, most of the readers here are so much further ahead of you in social and environmental awareness that you really are just making a fool of yourself with those poorly developed accusations.
Gareth Griffiths
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2009 12:08 AM
Joined: 01/06/2009
Posts: 7


I really liked sailing
Wazza
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2009 5:22 AM
Joined: 25/10/2009
Posts: 1


I agree with Gareth I just love to Sail
tonio71
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2009 10:56 AM
Joined: 15/10/2009
Posts: 5


It seems that you know perfectly the industry and the point of posting such a message is to aware the yachtie community. There is no accusation. You accept your condition, you live in your little world  and "ignore" the rest. Fine. Just be honnest with yourself. We could use our energy, time and money to better purpose...that's it. We won't change the world today but we can do few things to improve it (e.g. reduce the time spent to clean up our boat and therefore reduce the amount of freshwater used). Remember how many people who don't have access to clean water...

thank you


Henning
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2009 11:21 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


tonio71 wrote:

Folks,

You make me sick...it's a pity you don't have just human gene.

Don't you think that your life would be more helpfull by working for people who really need attention. Imagine the budget of a 40m motoryacht, imagine having 20 millions euros to build school, improve health care or install pumps and other water system.

Human dignity is the true measure of human development....think about it.


 

That's actually a very good subject, it should be for another thread, but let me address it quickly. First off, that boat, the 20 million Euro boat, cost around 10 million euros to build. That money was put back into the economy paying wages of all those who worked directly on the project, and those companies that supplied the bit's and pieces all the way to those who mined the raw materials be the metal or petroleum based.  Figure that boat during its build fed several hundred deserving families for 3 years. New owners are typically given a figure to budget, for upkeep and zero fuel operations, of 10% of the cost of the vessel annually. That's reasonably correct unless the previous owner didn't, then it will take more to get & keep her up to standards. So there is another 2 million euros annually put into the local economies of everywhere the vessel visits. Then there are the taxes as well, not the vessel itself mind you, which can vary by flag, but consumption and excise taxes from all the places it visits. The fact is, these yachts support schools and roads and local communities all over the world. They provide people with the ability to dig their own wells.


junior
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2009 1:25 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Of course what you say is true...all consumerism creates jobs. Bulding HUMMERS creates jobs. Yachts are no different. The question is.... are these jobs and money spent beneficial to society ? Is an American who builds a Mega yacht in the Netherlands, flags it in the Caymans, charters it abroad , maintains it in Spain, all while burning tax free fuel, benefiting the society which allowed him to reap great riches ? Ive worked for plenty of Billionaires, some are modest, Fly their national flag with pride, behave discreetly are careful with resources.... some just don't give a dam and work every loophole in society so that they can consume ever more and more . Its a shame that society has alowed a system to become entrenched which promotes this.
tonio71
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2009 2:03 PM
Joined: 15/10/2009
Posts: 5


when you ask yourself "why are you a yachtie", please consider also those questions: is it right to use 2 tonnes of freshwater to clean up a boat everyday....or is it a fair that a single guy waste 5000 litres of fuel to go lunching in st tropez?

However I read in a previous post that "most of the readers here are so much further ahead of you in social and environmental awareness...." so I feel really positive for the future.

 


Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2009 2:45 PM

Anonymous wrote:

Cos I make Loads of Dosh !
Meet the Rich and Famous...................
And get to Fly in Private Airplanes and Helicopters.................
Have Appartments in Cannes,Marbella,Paris,Monte Carlo,New York,London,Singapore.................Hey !

 

HEY THA' YACHT OWE-NAS!

(Oh c'mon, not all posts have to be warm and fuzzy)

 

Ah but of course...DOSH!

Many internationals such as SAfricans and Eastern/Northern Europeans, Kiwis, and other English internats (ooh, did I just come with a new word?) need the dough...while so many pretend to "LOVE" the sea and lie about skill sets and experience, while taking advantage of dumb American and European owners who prefer "them" over "others"..even over their own. And not that I really want to say such, but here goes, (I don't think I've ever been this crass) ...if you spread 'em to "these" people they will, well you know the rest..and as much as they can, because MOOLA is wonderful to these people. MOOLA robs people of their intelligence and pride.

 

Someone needs to bare in mind and put on their Thinking Cap and realize that if fickle and under educated people think You're fickle (say you being an yacht owner or captain), it will be a A LOT easier to take Your money while living on Your yacht.   Think about it, you know it's not like CRITICAL thinking or anything, just common sense: if You (no matter who you are or think you are) are seen in a slighted way, it's a WHOLE lot easier for "them" to Kiss Your A** if you show them the Money. Now, if they actually did respect you (like more of YOUR OWN does...since it's part of being an American), you'll have more honest and decency around You..even if some of us Americans are "louder". Not people pretending to "respect" you while really being indifferent. Did you get that, Mr. Allen....Mr. Ellison?

Why - many of these peeps get to buy Macs, iphones, nice taylored suits, jewelry, cars.. bekkies or whatever you call them, HOUSES (sometimes three stories!!), that or invest their dough (or "yours" or what should have been "yours")...such as investing somewhere in the US.  That while, wait, I just lost my train of thought...hmm where was I....oh that's right, while TAKING legal and qualified people's jobs away.

Money will make just about anyone kiss other's behinds. It's just too powerful for many yachties to resist with pride or out of respect for a nation's laws. Ditto for those (2 or 3) Americans in Europe! Those 2 or 3 should be ashamed as well.


-Sincerely,

A typically good natured person.

 


Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2009 10:31 PM
This comment was removed by the moderators because it breaks our forum guidelines
Gareth Griffiths
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2009 10:38 PM
Joined: 01/06/2009
Posts: 7


"As for being called a Yactie hardly derogatory in our circles seamen or sailor is more applicable to those in fishing or the navy, don't ya think? Last but not least the Money is bloody excellent" good on ya croyds...! we'll teach you to sail eventually. but we love having you about mate.
Henning
Posted: Tuesday, October 27, 2009 2:22 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Debbie, welcome to the thread. Glad you made it, because I was hoping you'd answer the original question and only the question. "Why did you become...?" What aspect of this industry makes you want it so bad?
Fitzy
Posted: Tuesday, October 27, 2009 3:08 PM
Joined: 03/10/2008
Posts: 12


Careful Henning, your going to opening a whole other can of worms. But it would be interesting to hear what our favorite wanna be yachtie/columnist has to say. I'm bored and need a good laugh....
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, October 28, 2009 12:22 AM
Boats. Ocean. Travel. Cultures. People. A Living that I enjoyed for many years and one I hoped to get back into failing all else.
and Fitzy's photo on Triton.

Fitzy
Posted: Wednesday, October 28, 2009 12:51 AM
Joined: 03/10/2008
Posts: 12


Haha I have no comeback for that. That's the worst photo I could have put on there. Well played, Anonymous...Well played... Hope you can find a job and prove all of your critics wrong...
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 16, 2010 3:20 PM
sailing, sailing, sailing sailing, if you don't sail, you will never understand.
 
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