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A REAL Cultural Melting Pot
stevenpete
Posted: Tuesday, May 12, 2009 9:33 AM
Joined: 09/01/2009
Posts: 21


Not too long ago I posted on another yachting website that I wanted to have a “cultural melting pot” on board and that I was looking forward to a global perspective beyond that which could be offered by “a lot of ethnocentric Americans.”

Several other forum members took me to task on my post and even called me a bigot for my prejudice against Americans. On this website, there have been posts by others complaining about prejudice against other nationalities, like South African, or a favor towards hiring Australians or New Zealanders, etc.

Although my desire to hire an international crew has not changed, I would hope that the “cultural diversity” that I’m seeking will go beyond just nationality and that my captain will not overlook possible crew members of different ethnicities, social classes, age, and sexual orientation.

I think back in my life to all the friends, associates and people that have made a difference in my life and have contributed to my life experience—I would sorely miss all those that were not like me. Besides, that is one of the greatest perks about being a liberal, is that I can have all kinds of friends and no one can hold it against me. So, beyond the topics of discrimination over ageism, and nationality, where are all the Hispanic, Asian and African crew? Is there actually a gay crew member, captain or another gay owner out there? It’s almost as if the yachting community of 2009 is stuck in the culture of June and Ward Cleaver in the 1950s. Certainly, it’s not because these ethnic backgrounds have no interest or experience in yachting—although it wouldn’t surprise me to learn that no self respecting gay man would be caught dead in Dockers and those silly epaulets. I’ve ran a search for gay on several yachting websites and every single search has come back with absolutely no results—not even one! It’s as if gays and lesbians don’t even exist in this community. That seems a little odd to me.

 


Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, May 12, 2009 9:57 AM
There are some gay people in the industry, but they generally keep their private life just that, private. The crew who work with them are aware, and usually respect that privacy. You post on another thread that you are an about to be owner, if your time on board yachts has been as a guest, I see no reason why you would have become aware of any crew member's private sexual preferences. A professional crew would not have any reason to discuss anything personal about another crew member with a guest. Quite correctly, regardless of what gender the other crew members partner may be, same or opposite. You sound like you will be a great owner to work for, as you say, a great cultural melting pot can greatly enhance the team, but, please remember that your crews deeply personal life, is just that. They will adore you for welcoming the diversity, but respecting that some areas in their life are simply PRIVATE.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, May 12, 2009 5:21 PM

Plenty of successful gay entrepreneurs own yachts.  I'm not aware of any gay crew but I'm absolutely confident that gays are working at all levels in the yachting industry.
  As far as crew diversity.  I would not go all starry eyed and change the world  when putting together your team. Crew are not yacht decoration or chess pieces they are work units.  The proper way to operate  a yacht is to match your crews diversity and talents to  the task you propose. For instance , If your cruising in Central American its not possible to operate effectively without key Spanish speaking crew.  This holds true in  Europe or any other area in which you plan to cruise.
   When I come next to a  boatload full of say Australians , who cant speak a foreign language and who don't  understand the culture,  guiding a yacht thru a foreign cruise schedule, I always notice that their movements are  constipated, simplistic and totally reliant on agents and third parties outside of thier control.
    Crew with local knowledge are what separates the world class superyachts from the lightweight, Lonely planet guide  superyachts  and provide you, the owner with the best, most indepth experience.

    Diversity is critical. Use  diversity to match crew to the cruise you propose.  We are enroute to the Black Sea, I have a russian crewmember


Debbie
Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 12:28 AM

[Comment deleted by moderator]

Please keep in mind that the country that has helped make you who and what you are in life has a bit more depth socially and creatively compared to a lot of other nations out there. And if we had more Americans in this particular industry, I, for one, am certain that we would have more diversity among crew. 

The longer everyone tolerates English internationals displacing other nationalities/ethnicities especially by way of illegal immigration/gainful employment in this biz, the longer it will stay FLAVORLESS.

 

You and other American yacht owners/cpts seem a bit narcissistic when it comes to putting American crew down. Get over yourself and embrace the fact that there are more Americans who retain their flavor.  Americans have shown more embulience and persona than their English international counterparts...i.e., when it comes to guest service and life in general.  Yes, there are some bad apples, but they all come from different parts of the world, not just America.  As if I need to explain this to a grown up from the States.

If anyone is curious, check out this Youtube vid on the link below. Before you click:  bare in mind that I'm not saying ALL think in the same way over America. Please, of course not.  But this video on youtube is an ACTUAL documentary. 

The narcissistic spew and [almost juvenile] rhetoric from these people equivocates to the kind of ignorance and narcissism from America's rednecks, thugs, drug cartels....and Me Generation teeny boppers.  I feel as if I'm watching some stupid sitcom on some Brit channel...but it's a doc.

Purely pathetic, but kind of amusing all the same.

Enjoy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Phr5TC_v_g

 


Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 1:53 AM
Very good point raised, I often find that crews are limited to certain nationalities, and while it may make it simpler with regards to customs and traditions etc it's a shame as so much can be learned from fellow crew who have grown up in different environments/had different experiences etc. I know which I'd choose given the choice. I've just watched the video, and as the documentary set out to only document anti-americans I think it is fair to say that the seemingly 'british' people sat around the dinner table are probably all 'bad apples' and just enforce the stereotype. I for one have never heard anything that snobby!!
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 2:53 AM
British people on holiday have such a terrible reputation for their behavior that many places simply refuse to have them. They regularly drink themselves to death in places like Spain and Greece. I always have a laugh when people think the Brits are so "polite." They can be the worst. Ask the British Consular in Ibiza what he thinks of the young Brits who holiday there. Sadly he's had pack up many corpses. Americans are suckers for an accent. And to be perfectly honest Americans would do well to utter a few more yes pleases and thank you very much(s). As for hiring an international crew if you are going to be cruising in American waters for any length of time I wouldn't bother, the visa situation is a pain in the butt. There are plenty of highly skilled, well educated, honest American crew out there for you to choose from. As far as gay crew, of course there are. Gay captains, gay crew, and gay owners. Most are very low key, but they are there. There was one very large yacht looking to hire crew that had a gay owners and all of the crew was gay as well because the owner felt more comfortable that way (gay men and gay women.) I'd like to see that one in a discrimination hearing... Congratulations on your new yacht and I hope you have many years of enjoyment.
stevenpete
Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 7:36 AM
Joined: 09/01/2009
Posts: 21


“Crew are not yacht decoration or chess pieces they are work units. The proper way to operate a yacht is to match your crews diversity and talents to the task you propose.”

Very good advice. It never occurred to me to bring on “regional” crew for cruising in their local waters just for the duration of our time in their waters. That’s an excellent idea. This would also help solve the problem of crew rotation since we could bring on new crew without having to fly them half way around the world.

I did have a similar idea regarding the chef aboard where we would have a “guest” chef to help bring all the rich culinary traditions and flavors to our table.

“There was one very large yacht looking to hire crew that had a gay owners and all of the crew was gay as well because the owner felt more comfortable that way (gay men and gay women.)”

There was a time in my life when I sought out the “gay ghetto” and most of my social friends and events were centered around that community, but for me, those days are long past. I have a lot of great memories from those days but now days my life raising a teenage son is much more ordinary with far more community, school, other families and family events filling our social calendar.

If the past is any indication of the future, I’m sure what will happen is that we’ll end up with a larger percentage of gays and lesbians applicants who are seeking work with a crew (in the past a company) that is less likely to discriminate against them—something that I hope we can offer to all of our crew.


Debbie
Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 6:02 PM

The owner of this thread seems to admit that he was once prejudice against  Americans [prejudice against Americans is one WAY to be deemed a bigot-- btw].  After reading what appears to be this person's main focus which is discussing gays in the biz more than anything else,  I can't really think of anything more hypocritical than a Gay American yacht owner who dislikes to hire Americans or gays in groups.

And to the poster who mentioned that a lot of Americans are suckers when it comes to accents, you're of course right.  A good reflection of [many] Americans being those kind of "suckers"  is the many  reality shows[realadramas] that seem to involve Brits in leadership roles..i.e. Chef Ramsay of Hell's Kitchen. 

I'm wondering if Chef Idiot'say would treat his fellow Brits like that.  He's horrible and just plain dumb. Some of you think I'm rude? Well, try watching this show for about 10 minutes. The guy acts like he's on drugs with some kind of mood disorder. So why do American media and audiences tolerate this kind of crap...that and those dumb nanny shows by a Brit who's never had kids? It's because Americans have become a growing, fat culture of naive nit wits.  But at least more Americans can admit these kinds of flaws from time to time, such as those in THIS biz. 

Speaking of which, we as yachties hardly hear or read about Brits/Aussies/SAs/Kiwis putting each other down at ALL.  I've certainly met some undesirables from those parts.  Why the silence, hmm? Is it because the ball seems to be in thier court? They have the jobs...so who cares? I wonder if the tables would turn if Americans were flying to Britian and Australia taking thier jobs away from them during the summer season. Hmm.

 


penguin
Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 6:24 PM
Joined: 18/11/2008
Posts: 2


Good discussion. I hope this opened up a few others minds of need out there.  America, a country of immigrants. That's pretty diverse.  I think when we look outside ourselves with glasses looking for 'diversity' we are looking within ourselves for discovery. Wanting to hire a crew of diversity is asking for diversity to show on the surface.  But get to know your crew, any crew and I assure you, you will find a VERY DIVERSE crew.  Please don't go outside yourself for your answers, your lessons are awaiting within, thank you.  Now please hire me

Alex
Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 6:56 PM
Joined: 28/05/2008
Posts: 2


I had to interrupt here, Ramsay is just as rude on the British versions of his shows... I wonder how he lasted a whole year working as a yacht chef?!?!  Some people really are just bad apples.

Local knowledge is certainly an invaluable tool!  I wish more yachts would take advantage.



Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 8:04 PM
The first part of the 80's there was a movement to rid yachting of the GAY stigma by designing yachts with co-ed crews quarters so eveyone could work male or female.Once one learned that a certain boat was gay all on board was gay weather or not they were,most were married with family's but talk was talk. Now that we are more liberal we tend to think than react.I hope now we can look at crew as crew and not hate.

bridgewatch
Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 8:51 PM
Joined: 28/10/2008
Posts: 23


Dear yacht owner Stevenpete, First of all, may I comment that it is refreshing to actually have an owner posting on one of the blogs of our industry sites. It shows your genuine interest in your yacht and passion for your new adventures on it and that you consider your crew to be a very important part of your experience onboard. I agree with the idea of seeking diversity in your crew. I also agree with the point about choosing the correct diversity for the regions you will be visiting due to visa constraints and of course also for having the advantage of crew onboard who speak the language of the region to be visited. In addition the choice of crew should take into consideration their experience levels and demeanour in order to form a more cohesive "team".  All of these are prudent choices and in a good combination could make for a great team onboard your yacht.

As a female captain (American) I welcome diversity in crew choices. One reason for me may be because I prefer to open the opportunity to those who have not received the chance to get the job due to certain stereotypes and criteria  that many captains or owners tend to use to choose their crew. I am personally familiar with this scenario. Glad to see that you are open to this diversity onboard. Much appreciated by many of us. By the way, if you are seeking a captain I am available and would welcome speaking to you in more depth about this. And for the great professional crew who have had a hard time getting that dream position onboard due to your lack of that certain stereotypical criteria that we all know about, send me your CV. Regards, Denise denfox@hotmail.com


Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 9:29 PM

I have seen where a food business needed a good rating and the rating could only be

obtained by the  non-straight persons, could not get straight persons to clean-up, follow

rules and be on time...this was a place in North Carolina, a college town. Of course after

saying that, I am sure one has many other examples to the opposite. But it is true that when

a person finds what course they are on....They can focus more on the profession and they

are a real profit factor to the over-all business.

Last thought - Crew on a vessel is a cross section of the world and good rules of command

only include what it takes to get the job done, in a safe manner, and hopfully some good money. 

"You get what you pay for!"


Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 10:19 PM
On an international yacht, its pretty much impossible to be a gay crew. Or, better stated, its impossible to be openly gay. The western world is liberated, educated  and always working towards a society free of discrimination. Unfortunately  many parts of the world that yachts visit  have  not reached this level of development.  We visit places with the yacht that are dangerous to openly gay crew. The only gay internationals that I know of on the yachts are ultra discreet.
captcary
Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 10:55 PM
Joined: 17/07/2008
Posts: 25


As an American captain I have worked with or had working for me gays (male and female).  I have had many friends in the industry - South Africans, Australians, British, Dominican,  Antiguan, Bahamian, Philippians, etc. etc.   Mostly I have worked with Americans.  Many times they can be a real pain in the but.  But this holds true with people from every country.  A culturally diverse crew is a nice target but you need to understand one issue.  These people don't just work together and go home at the end of the day.  They live together 24/7/365 if they make it that long.  A happy crew is one that gets along well together.  This is the Captains resposibility to hire these people.  They work for him, not you.  You should find a Captain that shares your same beliefs and policeis and start from there. 

Tenca
Posted: Thursday, May 14, 2009 8:39 AM
Joined: 04/09/2008
Posts: 3


Dear all, I have worked in yachting for over 6 years now. And although i always liked the industry for offering that variety of location, yacht owners nationality and crew's nationality. Lately I have been faced with looking for work again, and things are tough. Simply put yacht captains prefer Anglo Saxon (i.e. Australian, New Zealand, South African) crew. I myself am of European nationality, speak 5 languages and my English is perfect. This doesn't seem to make a difference though. So it seems that besides of what we may think in this forum/blog there is plenty of yacht owners and captains in particular who discriminate, maybe partially because of their concern how a European national will fit in with all the Anglo Saxons crew? That is a shame, as I really love my work and do it with a lot of pride. Anyway, guess we have to keep on fighting for this cultural melting pot in our industry.
stevenpete
Posted: Thursday, May 14, 2009 8:53 AM
Joined: 09/01/2009
Posts: 21


Penguin: “America, a country of immigrants. That's pretty diverse. I think when we look outside ourselves with glasses looking for 'diversity' we are looking within ourselves for discovery. … But get to know your crew, any crew and I assure you, you will find a VERY DIVERSE crew.  Please don't go outside yourself for your answers, your lessons are awaiting within, thank you.”

Penguin, I love the diversity that America offers. I’ve lived most of my life in communities that were a broad mixture of race, socio-economics and cultures. I never realized how much I liked the diversity of my home town until I went to a private university where almost everyone was white, middleclass and conservative. Since then I always seriously doubted the quality of education they can offer when everyone is so alike. I love our diverse America.

I like what you said about getting to know your crew. Anonymous  (the first post) gave me the feeling that the Up Stairs/Down Stairs divide was deeply entrenched in yachting and that it would be intrusive of my to ever expect to really get to know my own boats crew.

“The first part of the 80's there was a movement to rid yachting of the GAY stigma by designing yachts with co-ed crews quarters so everyone could work male or female. Once one learned that a certain boat was gay all on board was gay [whether] or not they were, most were married with family's but talk was talk. Now that we are more liberal we tend to think than react. I hope now we can look at crew as crew and not hate.”

Oh yes, the infamous 80s. Thanks to the fear of AIDS and Pres. Regan, the 80s will now go down in US History as the most homophobic decade in US history. It was a very dark decade for the gay community when they became the scapegoat for everything wrong with America. I didn’t come out until the mid-90s so I’m fortunate to have missed most of nightmare but the survivors still talk about the 80s with a deep sorrow.

 

Bridgewatch: “…it is refreshing to actually have an owner posting on one of the blogs of our industry sites. … By the way, if you are seeking a captain I am available and would welcome speaking to you in more depth about this. And for the great professional crew who have had a hard time getting that dream position onboard due to your lack of that certain stereotypical criteria that we all know about, send me your CV.”

 

I post on a few other yachting websites that have a lot of owners that are actively involved. They’ve been incredibly helpful in my quest for knowledge about the industry. It’s been interesting to see the different POVs from those websites to this one. In fact, I was referred to this website by an owner, and I’m aware that many other owners read the website as well.

Denise, I’ll certainly keep you in mind. I’m a few months out before I hire a Captain.

“On an international yacht, it’s pretty much impossible to be a gay crew. Or, better stated, it’s impossible to be openly gay. The western world is liberated, educated and always working towards a society free of discrimination. Unfortunately many parts of the world that yachts visit have not reached this level of development. We visit places with the yacht that are dangerous to openly gay crew. The only gay internationals that I know of on the yachts are ultra discreet.

It is true that there are certain countries that don’t make it onto very many openly gay peoples itinerary. Unfortunate for me, many of these countries are ones that I would like to visit. In the past I’ve received many letters to repent sent by well meaning Christians and only a few of them threatened violence. But, I suppose the zealots in other societies may be a far greater threat to my safety then the zealots in America, so I really should be careful. Who knows, maybe I’ll have to hire a beard to pose as my wife/girl friend during those travels.

Captcary: “A culturally diverse crew is a nice target but you need to understand one issue.  These people don't just work together and go home at the end of the day.  They live together 24/7/365 if they make it that long. A happy crew is one that gets along well together. This is the Captains responsibility to hire these people. They work for him, not you. You should find a Captain that shares your same beliefs and policies and start from there.”

That is very good advice and something to remember about my relationship with my Captain’s crew. Some of my son’s friends are recent immigrants to the US and in their homes they continue to eat the cuisine of their native countries. For them, the food we serve at our house is foreign. Although it’s been a lot of fun to introduce them to many new foods, I imagine it could be difficult for a yacht chef to continually please everyone with very diverse ethnic backgrounds. And, like you inferred, that’s saying nothing about ALL the other cultural differences.   


Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, May 14, 2009 11:00 AM

I've taken the easy route for this and choosen to be Anonymous, (i'm job hunting) as a young gay crew i've never felt any reason to explain to people my lifestyle, certainly while squeezing homosexual between non smoker and full driving license might get me one job i'm sure many captains would simply discard me and more as it would rasie the question of 'why does he need to tell me this'. I've been fortunate for the last five years that the boats i've worked on have not affected my life some crew knew some don't (or might do but just never said) and i've always been happy with the atmosphere onboard. I'm not sure how at an interview I would take being questioned on my sexuallity as it certainly doesnt affect my ability to perform professionally.

As for multinational crew I've worked with some great people (austrailians, kiwis, americans, spanish, british, irish, canadians argentinians) and outside work met some terrible ones from everywhere, coming form Northern Ireland i've a good understanding of the problems caused by a cultural clash, yet without it I wouldn't be the person i am now. Perhaps physics holds the answer, when creating alloys its by mixing precise amounts of very different materials to a common base that a product that performs better than any of its constituant parts is formed, mix it incorrectly and you create an expensive waste. Get the right Captain and let him/her add the best elements and you'll have a strong crew who might even have some longevity.

Good luck with the selection


captainmason
Posted: Thursday, May 14, 2009 6:29 PM
Joined: 27/07/2008
Posts: 96


Stevenpete, most of the above is correct but the main reason gay crew may not be hired goes back to the accommodation situation, who do they share with ? the opposite sex or same sex, either could cause the Capt. problems he does not need, of course in the situation of a majority gay crew this should not be a problem. Rest assured though that there are many gay crew out there, I know 2 captains of the top of my head, and have known several excellent stewards. Please also keep in mind that like Rome it takes a while to get the right crew together, as has already been said it is more than just the ability to do the job. Good luck.

stevenpete
Posted: Friday, May 22, 2009 4:14 PM
Joined: 09/01/2009
Posts: 21


CaptainMason: “Stevenpete, most of the above is correct but the main reason gay crew may not be hired goes back to the accommodation situation, who do they share with? The opposite sex or same sex, either could cause the Capt. problems he does not need …”

 

I think you might be onto something here. But isn’t “…could cause the Capt. problems he does not need…” the exact same reason why Stewardesses are wrongfully fired when they complain about being sexually harassed by other crew or even the captain himself? From what it sounds like on many of the posts on this very website, the reason many crew are let go, with little or no notice, is because they have caused a problem, knowingly or not, that the “…[Captain] does not need…”

 

In fact, isn’t that the very reason that many people in all societies simply tow the status quo and resist any change, which of course includes every single important civil rights decision our society has had to make since the civil war, like freedom of the slaves, woman’s suffrage, protections for the working class under the robber barons, etc. etc?

 

Of course any sexual predator onboard, weather gay or straight is going to cause problems for their prey, and whether or not the Captain accepts his responsibility to mitigate and to show dignity and respect to ALL his crew is another story. Sadly, from what we’ve seen, that in itself is a whole other problem and quite frankly—that is a shame. Whether it’s the issue you mentioned above or any another, like the Catholic Church in Ireland, it’s always wrong for those in authority to skirt their responsibility for protecting and respecting those in their care. Whether from laziness, ignorance or open contempt, the results are the same and innocent people, whether gay or straight, are being hurt.

 

Isn’t it about time that the Captains of our crews began to take full responsibilities for their actions!

 

The Canadian military doesn’t have a problem with gays in their service. College dorms are full of questioning, closeted and openly gay people and if they’re not at a Christian college, they’re doing just fine. Back in my college days, any problem I had with a roommate wasn’t because I was gay and even when I was a Boy Scout in my youth, me being gay was never a problem. Isn’t it about time our captains step beyond the stereotype and see the individual—no matter what our differences are?
waves
Posted: Saturday, May 30, 2009 3:22 PM
Joined: 13/06/2008
Posts: 7


With all due respect, I believe you are not getting it.  The problem with having some gay crew is.....

Crew are usually distributed 2 to a cabin and share a bathroom. It is common practice to put girls together and boys together.  Not for purely sexual reasons, but for reasons of privacy/modesty.  If you have a gay deckie, the straight deckie will most likely not want to bunk with him.  The straight stew, will not want to share a cabin with a guy most likely, so where does that leave you? Hire another gay male? Will they bunk together?  what if they are not an item? One one yacht I worked on, due to crew accomodations, the mate and stew had to share a cabin.  The owners of this yacht were very religious and did not want unmarried people of opposite sexes to share a cabin, so they hired a male steward.  Well Surprise!!...he was gay!  Now you had this gorgeous young guy sharing a cabin with an old "Flamer" it was probably Not what the owners had in mind and the mate left the boat almost immediately.  See what I mean?  So generally, you go all gay or all straight, it doesn't really work otherwise


Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, May 31, 2009 12:24 AM
To the latest entry: hogwash!!! Most of the gay people I've had onboard were acutely aware of their cabinmates sexual orientation and wouldn't dream of making untoward advances simply because it disturbs the their lives and those around them. Besides they didn't find their cabinmates attractive enough. So if you worry about being ogled by your cabinmate, rest assured that he only confirms his lack of interest in you!
Henning
Posted: Friday, July 3, 2009 1:04 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


"It never occurred to me to bring on “regional” crew for cruising in their local waters just for the duration of our time in their waters. That’s an excellent idea. This would also help solve the problem of crew rotation since we could bring on new crew without having to fly them half way around the world." If you are limiting that to ephemeral positions and maybe that of a second mate who knows the local waters, yards and chandlers that could be a very useful practice. However, a yacht is a very complex machine and each has its own quirks and issues. You really need a continuity of your core crew, Master, and chiefs of departments: Engineer's, Steward's and Deck. I believe in the long run, hiring complete crews, even if you keep the same captain, will be more expensive than rotating a loyal crew even half way around the world business class. There are also several safety issues, it usually takes me a month before I get a crew trained to the point where I can expect them to do things the way I like. There are also security issues. It's not that easy to vet out crew as trustworthy, especially in some poorer more remote parts of the world. There have been plenty of instances where owners have brought aboard crew in foreign ports only to have them kill everyone aboard and steal the vessel. In my experience, when you find a good crew, you do what you must to keep them. Life on a boat is a bit of a unique circumstance as is your relationship with your crew. It is part business and part familial as we all have to watch out for each other. As captain, it's my profession and pride to watch out for everyone on board. The best, happiest, boats I have been on where the owner lives aboard have had a three generation feel to them regardless of the ages of those involved. Owner is like a grandfather, captain like a father with the mate, chief stew and engineer as his younger siblings, and crew like the kids. It's a bit different on a charter boat, or one where the owner uses it as a floating place to entertain. In those situations the owner is typically differentiated from the crew in a professional relationship. When the owner lives aboard, this can often cause stress amongst the crew because unlike a job where you put in your time and go home to a relaxed informal atmosphere, on a boat, you always have to be "on". Right now I run a boat. The owner (a great guy) is from New Zealand, I'm an American, My engineer, mate and deckhand are Aussies and my steward and chef are Indians. The cultural melting pot is not an issue. People are people world wide. It's about finding the right people where ever they are from. We have a good time, we all joke around, everyone smiles, and everyone does their job well.
 
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