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When Animals Attack
KKS
Posted: Monday, March 9, 2009 4:00 PM
Joined: 02/05/2008
Posts: 40


How many shark attacks have there been by sharks in salt water aquariums? I had to put my pet bullshark to sleep after she attacked a tiny plastic scuba diver. it was a truly gruesom sight, there was blood all over the little pink castle. that was the hardest toilet flushing i think ive ever had to do, unless you count the one at taco bell friday night
Posted by scott olbeter 09/03/2009 04:35:50

Oh dear, I'm afraid the ISAF would view your flushing (the shark one, not the taco bell one) as a miscarriage of justice. According to the official guidelines, your diver was the victim of a "provoked" attack. Your beloved bull shark was simply doing the plastic-diver DNA pool a favor.
All this aside, your question is an interesting one. I will try to find an answer...stand-by.
Posted by KKS 09/03/2009 14:34:27

I just got off the phone with the curator for the International Shark Attack File. I asked him how many people were attacked in Aquariums and he says that attacks occur just about every year in Aquariums. However, these attacks are typically minor bites that occur during feeding time. Occasionally an incident will cross his desk where a caretaker is injured while cleaning an enclosure, but that those attacks are more rare. He is not aware of any aquarium fatalities.  (I did not bother to mention the incident with your beloved bull shark and scuba diver.)

Interestingly, Mr. Burgess did say that in aquariums dolphins are considered much more dangerous than sharks. They tend to get territorial and will inflict blows to handlers or caretakers by ramming them or striking them with their tails. They can cause very severe injuries. Another concern is when a dolphin attempts to "mount" a caretaker. Evidently this is not uncommon. Cheeky cetaceans lookin for some sapien love. Makes you think twice before shelling out big money to swim with the dolphins. Yikes. Don't know too many people who'd be too happy to have a 400 pound dolphin swimming over to say "How you doin'?"


 
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