Welcome to the Dockwalk.com Forum

 

In order to post a comment in one of the forum topics, you must log in or sign up. Your display name will appear next to your posts unless you check the Post Anonymously box. When writing a post, please follow our forum guidelines. If you come across a post that you would like us to review, use the Report Post button. Please note the opinions shared in the forums do not necessarily reflect the views of Dockwalk.


RSS Feed Print
Antibes or Ft Lauderdale for training this March?
Deckhand_Ryder
Posted: Thursday, January 29, 2009 6:33 PM
Joined: 22/01/2009
Posts: 6


I am aspiring deckhand and will be arriving in Ft Lauderdale at the end of February to begin training for an entry level deck position. My plan is to train here in the states, and secure a job sometime in March, on a boat which will be on the Mediterranean this summer. My question is, would I have better chances of getting a job over in Antibes this time of year? Should I go straight there to train? Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Ryder
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, January 30, 2009 8:43 PM
Definitely Ft Lauderdale.  Antibes is more expensive and will be busy with every out of work European looking for a job this year!

Train in Ft Lauderdale and arrive there with tickets in hand!

Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 31, 2009 4:40 AM
Anonymous wrote:
Definitely Ft Lauderdale.  Antibes is more expensive and will be busy with every out of work European looking for a job this year!

Train in Ft Lauderdale and arrive there with tickets in hand!


This sounds like a stupid question, but what are those tickets for? 


Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, February 1, 2009 5:01 PM
By tickets I mean licences, certificates or whatever the young folks are calling them these days......
Deckhand_Ryder
Posted: Monday, February 2, 2009 3:54 AM
Joined: 22/01/2009
Posts: 6


Thanks everyone! Good advice!
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 3, 2009 4:41 AM
If you are a foreigner and your intention is to take courses in the USA and then after completion of courses you try to obtain a job on a foreign flagged yacht which is visiting the US and is still located in the US, you will find that this is againt US visa regulations for B1/B2 holders. You will have to exit the US after taking the (cheaper) courses and apply for jobs while abroad. The crew agents in South Florida will be asking you why you are here and if you didn't arrive on a yacht but rather to take courses and then try to seek employment on a yacht while in the US you will be in violation of US visa regulations. Be aware, the crew agents are savvy to this and WILL ask for visa verification of how and why you entered the USA. Also, the crew agents are savvy to crew members leaving a yacht while in the USA and trying to obtain another job on a yacht that is in the USA. These crew members must first leave the USA and then return to change the "intention" status on their B1/B2 visa. If you only have the C1/D visa you are out of luck to get a job on a yacht while in the USA as well and in most cases no yacht will take crew with only this visa no matter where it is located.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 3, 2009 2:08 PM
Nonesense

If that were the reality there would be no training or crew placement industry in Ft Lauderdale.  If that were the reality there would hardly any reason for yachts to go to Lauderdale and the yachting  economy would crumble.  Training in Lauderdale and job seeking are unrelated.  As yacht training is not considered full time education, yachties would not qualify for student visas.  Regarding job seeking you had better tell all of the (surviving) crew agents that they are breaking the law soon as they have only been around for about 20 years or so and tthey haven't found out yet!

monback
Posted: Tuesday, February 3, 2009 3:06 PM
Joined: 21/01/2009
Posts: 36


Hey deckie....sometimes its best, no matter what the cost differential, to take your  STCW95 in the area that you will be searching for a job.  You will make new friends and connections while taking the class and this will inevitably help you navigate around new and unknown terrain.
Deckhand_Ryder
Posted: Tuesday, February 3, 2009 6:52 PM
Joined: 22/01/2009
Posts: 6


That does make sense. I am US citizen though, and it would be easiest to train in Florida. My goal is to line up some work while I am in still in Florida for the upcoming season on the Med. I will be looking for a full time deck position.
junior
Posted: Tuesday, February 3, 2009 7:16 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


And be wise over in Europe.  Im in Spain at the moment and its a bit slow  on the water just like everyplace else.  Perhaps its good in that less crew will make the trip over to seek work...or millions of crew will pile over and  swamp the market.  Be prepared for plan B
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, February 4, 2009 5:06 PM
When would be the best time to head over to find work in Europe? And being a US citizen, would I need any Visas over in France or Spain, etc..?
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, February 5, 2009 6:54 AM

Dear Aspiring Deckie Ryder and ALL foreign crew entering the USA to train or find work on a foreign flagged "yacht that is in the USA",

Knowing that deckie Ryder is an American he obviously would have no problem going to Ft. Lauderdale for training for working on yachts. The issue is about US VISAs addressed previously in this forum for visiting foreign crew and aspiring crew entering the USA for training. IT IS TRUE. Those of you who are new to this industry may not  know that this industry has been going through major changes in many respects in recent years, both in the USA and abroad. One of which is major changes in US VISAs and what foreigners can or cannot do while in the USA holding their VISAs. US Customs and Border Protection is now cracking down on this issue concerning the large population of foreign crew who come to the USA to train for a career on yachts and then try to get a job on a visiting "yacht that is in the USA". Recently, there have been a number of seminars conducted  for yacht captains with members of the USCG and  US Customs and Border Protection explaining it all. THE CREW AGENTS ARE BECOMMING VERY SAVVY TO THIS. However, most of the US based agencies have satellites in Europe so it really dosen't affect them much because they can place crew there as well. Please read the article in the Dockwalk http://www.dockwalk.com/Essentials/HotTopics.aspx?id=20438 which explains it very well. This article also addresses VISAs for any foreign crew who leave a yacht while in the USA and try to get on another yacht that is in the USA (foreign flagged yachts). They MUST leave the USA and re-enter with a letter and yacht documents from the captain of the new yacht. The catch is that there is no guarantee how many months their VISA will be stamped for re-entry into the USA. Be aware also that a Schengen VISA is also necessary for many non-EU visitors going to Europe to train or find work on yachts there. Find out if this affects you.

If you aspire to continue in ths industry, I suggest that you educate yourself with as much "reliable" information as possible about regulations etc. There is alot of "reliable" information readily availabe for you in our industry magazines and from speaking directly to the industry leaders such as the folks at MPT and IYT and yacht management companies and also directly from the US Customs and Border Protection. Do not rely on hear-say from yacht acquaintances to tell you what is what.

Who, knows, one day you may be that captain of a yacht and you will need to be well informed about all of this and then some........cheers, Concerned captain trying to help.


Deckhand_Ryder
Posted: Thursday, February 5, 2009 7:09 AM
Joined: 22/01/2009
Posts: 6


Thanks Captain! Great advice, I registered for classes today at IYT and appreciate your advice, especially with the Schengen visa and will make sure to get the information I need from the right sources.
junior
Posted: Thursday, February 5, 2009 11:33 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Best time in Palma ??.  Well that depends on what kind of skills you have.  At present the yachts are in Maintenance schedule and not hiring crew.  Easter typically brings on the crew selection surge.  If you have a skill that you can sell as daywork...varnish, rope and leather work etc ...then now is a great time.  The boys are stripping the cap rails on the yacht next to me today.  I noticed that no leather work, rigger guys are hustling the waterfront this winter. Practice your baseball stitch and get on with it.


Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, April 30, 2009 9:10 PM

Hello

I am South African with a 10 year B1/B2 visa  and a 3 month Shengen holiday visa.  I do have a seamans record book and all the necessary seafearers medical paperwork, STCW, RYA Deckhand qualification etc.  I am almost ready to jump on the plane to go to Mallorca and/or Antibes in search for a yachting position.

My question is having only a Schengen holiday visa - does it mean I have only 3 months to get a job and what are positives and negatives/pitfalls?. Could I extend my stay longer than 3 months when in Europe etc?  How would my seamans book "override" a limited 3 month Schengen visa.  Also if I do get employed in Spain/France, I trust that I do not have to come back to South Africa get a work visa for Europe from here, but all paperwork will be dealt with in Europe.??

Furthermore I assume I will also be ok to go to Ford Lauderdale if all fails in Europe with my B1/B2 ....

Lastly if I only arrive in Mallorca or Antibes end of May would I still be in good timing?

 

Please advise.

 

Helen

 

 

 


Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, April 30, 2009 10:07 PM
Do you really wanna come over here NOW though? there are already hundreds of new deckhands looking for their first job just like you, no experience, just their STCW95, looking to make their break in the industry, yet there is no jobs, what will make you different? whats something you have that they dont and that captains will hire you for? Antibes atm is crazy, deckhands everywhere you look. I dont know what its like across the pond in the carribean right now but surely there's gotta be more on than over here in the med?

Debbie
Posted: Friday, May 1, 2009 2:04 AM
Anonymous wrote:

Dear Aspiring Deckie Ryder and ALL foreign crew entering the USA to train or find work on a foreign flagged "yacht that is in the USA",

Knowing that deckie Ryder is an American he obviously would have no problem going to Ft. Lauderdale for training for working on yachts. The issue is about US VISAs addressed previously in this forum for visiting foreign crew and aspiring crew entering the USA for training. IT IS TRUE. Those of you who are new to this industry may not  know that this industry has been going through major changes in many respects in recent years, both in the USA and abroad. One of which is major changes in US VISAs and what foreigners can or cannot do while in the USA holding their VISAs. US Customs and Border Protection is now cracking down on this issue concerning the large population of foreign crew who come to the USA to train for a career on yachts and then try to get a job on a visiting "yacht that is in the USA". Recently, there have been a number of seminars conducted  for yacht captains with members of the USCG and  US Customs and Border Protection explaining it all. THE CREW AGENTS ARE BECOMMING VERY SAVVY TO THIS. However, most of the US based agencies have satellites in Europe so it really dosen't affect them much because they can place crew there as well. Please read the article in the Dockwalk http://www.dockwalk.com/Essentials/HotTopics.aspx?id=20438 which explains it very well. This article also addresses VISAs for any foreign crew who leave a yacht while in the USA and try to get on another yacht that is in the USA (foreign flagged yachts). They MUST leave the USA and re-enter with a letter and yacht documents from the captain of the new yacht. The catch is that there is no guarantee how many months their VISA will be stamped for re-entry into the USA. Be aware also that a Schengen VISA is also necessary for many non-EU visitors going to Europe to train or find work on yachts there. Find out if this affects you.

If you aspire to continue in ths industry, I suggest that you educate yourself with as much "reliable" information as possible about regulations etc. There is alot of "reliable" information readily availabe for you in our industry magazines and from speaking directly to the industry leaders such as the folks at MPT and IYT and yacht management companies and also directly from the US Customs and Border Protection. Do not rely on hear-say from yacht acquaintances to tell you what is what.

Who, knows, one day you may be that captain of a yacht and you will need to be well informed about all of this and then some........cheers, Concerned captain trying to help.

 

For internationals coming into the States to look for work: it is illegal to come in on a tourist visa and look for work. 

 

It is also illegal to recieve a position while in the States before flying to a place like the Bahamas in order to receive a B2 and B1 respectively.  ICE is cracking down on this practice. And if these recruiters here in the States are becoming "savy" about all "this",  it is basically because Americans like myself have reported them [one by one and year after year] to the point that ICE and Customs Border Protection are investigating and cracking down.  Recruiters are still trying to recruit foreign crew here in the States however possible.  And no matter how snivelling you agents can get, I hope it doesn't fly.   There is a serious issue with quality in this industry and among recruiters.

 Many recruiters are suggesting to these candidates to fly to the Bahamas or say Costa Rica and fly back into the States so that it seems "legit".  It is a sham and scam nonetheless.  Sooner or later, these recruiters will be charged with immigration fraud and will be prosecuted.  Most recruiters in this industry have survived/thrived off of illegal aliens time and time again for two decades.  I hope by the power of decent [and smart] people in this country, things will change for the better and for what is appropriate for all candidates.


Cheryl
Posted: Monday, May 18, 2009 12:39 AM
Joined: 18/05/2009
Posts: 1


What happens when my boyfriend lost his work visa as a yacht captain, is forced to re=apply and now they are telling him for us to do a fiance visa would make it even worse. He had already spend thousands of dollars towards his U.S. citizenship while he was here working and lost his working visa due to his employer failure to process necessary papers. Something is wrong with the immigration process.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, July 14, 2009 1:43 PM

whats the deal for a british citizen who has a b1b2 visa from a previous entry on a yacht some years back and wants to go FL to secure a job on a foreign flagged vessel there? I would not be going in to do training first and then look for a job. Do i need to have secured a job on yacht first with paperwork from the captain at immigration-its impossible to find this info specifically on websites i have looked at without having to call an embassy and its impossible to speak to a human being in these places.

I dont want to be locked up or sent home!

Re:PALMA - can anyone advise where are docks to walk, and is it easy to dockwalk through marina's without passcodes etc....is March a decent time to head there?

Lots of ?'s but hope useful to others out there too.


 
 Average 0 out of 5