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Entering the US
Colin Gillies
Posted: Tuesday, September 23, 2008 11:09 PM
Joined: 30/08/2008
Posts: 1


I found myself in a sticky situation last week when I was flying from Canada to Fort Lauderdale. Having a one way ticket, and no ties to Canada (I am finished university and dont have a wife or kids) they assumed I was would to be working in Ft Lauderdale, so I was denied entry and now will be red flagged everytime I enter the States. Is there any way to get around this border situation and get to Fort Lauderdale without hassel?
MatrixLloyd.com
Posted: Thursday, September 25, 2008 1:11 PM
Joined: 19/05/2008
Posts: 52


Hi Colin It is quite easy to see their point of view if only had a one-way ticket. The rules on this are tough and are changing all the time. Even at MatrixLloyd we have a hard time keeping up with all the minutiae. I’d suggest you start by discussing your circumstances first with your local US Embassy, to see if there’s anything you can do to somehow reverse the situation (which I strongly doubt, however). Kind regards Benjamin Maltby Director MatrixLloyd http://www.matrixlloyd.com
Mark
Posted: Sunday, October 12, 2008 12:06 PM
Joined: 31/08/2008
Posts: 7


I have in the past purchased a fully refundable return ticket as well as a cheap one way ticket - I had to do this to get to Trinidad once ever though our vessel was their & we had all the paperwork etc.

So naturally once I arrived I showed them a retunr ticket & the had it refunderd to the credit card by our travel agent. Alternativly with some of the cheap one way fares you could buy a leg heading outside the USAA for a small amount & not use it if you did not need to.

Mark


Anonymous
Posted: Friday, October 24, 2008 12:36 AM
I woulds suggest you to go to the a visa via the US Embassy  Law offices of Eric Yankwitt PL 954-449-4368

Anonymous
Posted: Monday, July 29, 2013 11:31 AM

Hi Matrix

I am a New Zealand citizen and wish to fly to Fort Lauderdale in October to walk the docks for work as a junior Stew. 

With regards to Visa's, I am entitled to the visa-waiver program, however this is only valid for 90 days. So I'm thinking it will be best to apply for a b1b2 visa? What do you think?

Also, I have no experience as a Stewardess and can therefor not provide a letter of official employment from the USA.

I would sincerely appreciate any tips or advice you have for me! Thank you  


Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, July 30, 2013 5:08 AM

Anonymous wrote:

Hi Matrix

I am a New Zealand citizen and wish to fly to Fort Lauderdale in October to walk the docks for work as a junior Stew. 

With regards to Visa's, I am entitled to the visa-waiver program, however this is only valid for 90 days. So I'm thinking it will be best to apply for a b1b2 visa? What do you think?

Also, I have no experience as a Stewardess and can therefor not provide a letter of official employment from the USA.

I would sincerely appreciate any tips or advice you have for me! Thank you  

 

I think you need to read what the visa waiver allows you to do - looking for work certainly is NOT permitted.

 



Zenith
Posted: Tuesday, July 30, 2013 7:57 AM
Joined: 28/04/2011
Posts: 59


 

Sadly, entering the United States on the Visa Waiver Program in an effort to find work dock walking will unlikely find you work and in a worst case scenario could see you refused entry and/or deported. The VWP is restricted only the following (http://travel.state.gov/visa/temp/without/without_1990.html). 

For a crewmember to depart the United States on a pleasure yacht they will require a B1/B2 visa, or alternatively to depart on a commercial registered yacht they will require a C1/D. The CBP will not allow a crew member to depart on the vessel legally without this visa. 

Bear in mind that there will be many people already walking the docks who hold their B1/B2, STCW, ENG1 and various other courses and experience who will be in competition with you, so it’s unlikely a yacht will take a risk. 

Theoretically to obtain the B1/B2 visa you require supporting documents from an employer (see http://barbados.usembassy.gov/ship_crew.html ), however other posters on this forum have claimed success without these documents, although I my experience with putting crew through the B1/B2 process it can be strict and onerous.  

You would be better off looking at Europe and seeing about completing some of the training courses available which may put you ahead in terms of qualifications and provide you with some networking opportunities. 

Good luck with your endeavours. 

 With regards the original OP, whilst the post is old, should anyone else be in the same situation they should consider applying for a B1/B2 visa at the US Embassy and discussing their options for re-entry with the correct documents.  

 


 
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